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$100,000 grant from Hyundai Hope on Wheels to fund childhood sarcoma research
Hyundai Hope on Wheels and Raleigh-Durham Area Hyundai Dealers today awarded Ian Davis, MD, PhD, a $100,000 grant to support research into the causes of and treatments for pediatric sarcoma. Davis, assistant professor of pediatrics and genetics and a member of UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center is one of 71 recipients of Hyundai Hope on Wheels’ 2011 Hope Grant program, where $7.1 million will be awarded to support research and programs in honor of National Childhood Cancer Awareness Month.
Located in News / 2011 News
UNC spin-off receives $3M Small Business Innovation Research grant
Chapel Hill, NC – G-Zero Therapeutics, an RTP company started in 2008 based on technologies from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, has been awarded a $3 million Phase II Small Business Innovation Research Grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health.
Located in News / 2011 News
UNC scientists recommend rethinking brain MRI for early-stage lung cancer patients
UNC scientists report that in early stage, asymptomatic non-small cell lung cancer, early brain recurrences are potentially detectable prior to surgery and recommend that physicians consider including a routine pre-operative staging brain MRI. In addition, patients whose tumors are determined to be higher risk based on the findings at surgery, should consider post-operative MRI to offer early treatment of unrecognized metastasis.
Located in News / 2011 News
UNC, NC community colleges partner to prevent cancer
Project will assess needs and work to accelerate adoption of evidence-based cancer prevention interventions
Located in News / 2011 News
Charles Perou, PhD, appointed May Goldman Shaw Distinguished Professorship of Molecular Oncology Research
Chapel Hill, NC – Charles M. Perou, PhD, professor of genetics, and pathology & laboratory medicine, and leader of the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center breast cancer research program has been appointed the May Goldman Shaw Distinguished Professor of Molecular Oncology Research. The professorship, established by a $1 million gift from Wally (class of ’66) and Lil Loewenbaum of Austin, Texas is named in honor of Mrs. Lowenbaum’s mother, May Goldman Shaw.
Located in News / 2011 News
UNC nanotech entrepreneur to speak at TEDMED annual conference
Joseph DeSimone, PhD, has been invited to join an elite list of speakers at this year’s TEDMED Conference in San Diego, Calif., Oct. 25 – 28.
Located in News / 2011 News
Welcome to this year’s hematology/oncology fellows
Six new fellows have joined the Division of Hematology/Oncology.
Located in News / 2011 News
UNC cancer researcher awarded top V Scholar ranking
The V Foundation for Cancer Research announced this week that Greg Wang, PhD, has been awarded the Martin D. Abeloff, MD, V Scholar Award. This award goes to the research project that receives the highest rating from the V Foundation’s Scientific Advisory Board. Wang was tied with Hongwu Zheng, PhD, of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory for this honor and is the 10th V Scholar from UNC Lineberger.
Located in News / 2011 News
UNC scientists funded to study genome sequencing in clinical settings
Chapel Hill - The complete sequence of an individual’s genome – all 3 billion DNA building blocks - will soon be affordably available to doctors, patients and even consumers. While knowledge of one’s genome may have important medical benefits, tremendous questions remain regarding an avalanche of such data means and how they should be used. Many clinical, ethical and social issues arise from the evaluation, use and sharing of the data.
Located in News / 2011 News
Researchers identify components that keep immune system in check
CHAPEL HILL – Within the immune system, a subtle balance exists between the cells that destroy alien pathogens and those that preserve the body’s own tissues. When the balance gets out of whack, the cells that normally target viruses or bacteria can go astray, attacking innocent cells and causing autoimmune and inflammatory disease.
Located in News / 2011 News