Search results

53 items matching your search terms.
Filter the results.
Item type













New items since



Sort by relevance · date (newest first) · alphabetically
By forming clots in tumors, immune cells aid lung cancer's spread
Researchers led by UNC Lineberger's Chad Pecot, MD, report In the journal Nature Communications that for a particular subset of lung cancer tumors, there is a high prevalence of immune cells called inflammatory monocytes. These cells, which normally help to build clotting scaffolds to promote wound healing, also make it possible for tumor cells to migrate and spread to other parts of the body.
Located in News
UNC scientists create better laboratory tools to study cancer’s spread
In the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering, UNC Lineberger’s Andrew Wang, MD, and colleagues report they have developed tissue-engineered models for cancer metastases that reflect the microenvironment around tumors that promotes their growth. They believe their models, which were developed to study colorectal cancer that had spread to the liver and lung, will help scientists studying why cancers tend to spread to certain organs rather than others.
Located in News
UNC Lineberger sequences 10,000 tumors as part of national cancer genomics effort
UNC sequenced the RNA for 10,000 tumor samples as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas project, a National Cancer Institute and National Human Genome Research Institute-backed effort to create a comprehensive atlas of the genetic changes in cancer.
Located in News
Genetic alterations more common in tumors of older patients with metastatic breast cancer
In preliminary findings presented at the 2016 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, researchers showed that older patients were as likely as younger patients to receive targeted therapy and enroll in therapeutic trials based on their sequencing results.
Located in News
Racial gaps persist in how breast cancer survivors function, feel during treatment and after
A UNC Lineberger study published in the journal Breast Cancer Research and Treatment drew upon surveys that assessed health-related quality of life issues for women aged 20 to 74 years who lived in North Carolina and had breast cancer. The analysis was part of the third phase of the Carolina Breast Cancer Study.
Located in News
UNC-Chapel Hill spinout company generates more than $108M in stock offering
Founded with support from KickStart Venture Services, a UNC-Chapel Hill program that works to turn University research into new companies, G1 Therapeutics is developing novel therapeutics based on discoveries at UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.
Located in News
Images of health risks make indoor tanning messages more effective
UNC Lineberger's Seth Noar, PhD, and colleagues report in a new study that anti-tanning bed messages with images showing longer-term health effects, such as skin cancer or wrinkles, produced greater negative emotional reactions and higher ratings of effectiveness in a survey of female college students than text-only messages.
Located in News
In ovarian cancer, researchers uncover new drivers of cell division
UNC Lineberger's Michael J. Emanuele, PhD, and colleagues have identified a key activator that can turn on FoxM1, a protein that drives expression of genes that help cells replicate and divide, a finding they published in the journal Molecular and Cellular Biology. They also discovered, paradoxically, that the activator for FoxM1 is also responsible for turning this protein off.
Located in News
Bladder cancer model could pave the way for better drug efficacy studies
In the journal Cancer Research, UNC Lineberger’s William Y. Kim, MD, Benjamin G. Vincent, MD, and colleagues reported they have developed a mouse model of luminal bladder cancer, one of the two subtypes of advanced bladder cancer. The researchers said this model may help them to determine which patients may respond to immunotherapy treatments called checkpoint inhibitors.
Located in News
New UNC Lineberger faculty recruited to launch T-cell cancer therapy trials
Two new faculty members have joined the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center to help launch groundbreaking immunotherapy clinical trials that will test an experimental treatment in which patients’ own immune cells are genetically engineered to fight their cancer.
Located in News