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Online e-cigarette searches number in the millions, but few focus on vaping health risk or quitting smoking
A study published recently in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found that Google searches about electronic cigarettes were more commonly related to shopping for e-cigarettes, while quitting smoking represented less than 1 percent of e-cigarette searches in each of 2013 and in 2014. The study’s senior author was Rebecca S. Williams, MHS, PhD, a UNC Lineberger member.
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Blossom Damania, PhD, Assistant Dean for Research, professor of microbiology and immunology at the UNC School of Medicine and a member of UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.
Located in landing / / Images / 2016
Study finds gaps in patient knowledge of breast reconstruction surgery and complications
Researchers at UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center found that breast cancer patients surveyed about their knowledge of breast reconstruction were only moderately informed about the procedure, and their knowledge of complications was low. The study, published in the journal Annals of Surgery, surveyed 126 breast cancer patients planning to undergo mastectomy at the N.C. Cancer Hospital.
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New compound is effective against drug-resistant leukemia, preclinical study finds
Researchers at UNC Lineberger and at other institutions developed a new potential treatment for acute myeloid leukemia. In the journal JCI Insight, they report that the compound MRX-2843 more than doubled the median days of survival in laboratory models with a drug-resistant form of the disease.
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Promising treatment direction revealed for pancreatic cancers driven by KRAS mutation
In the journal Cancer Cell, UNC Lineberger researchers report findings of a promising strategy to treat KRAS-mutant pancreatic cancers. Preclinical studies showed promise for using a type of investigational drug that works by inhibiting the protein ERK, the last of a series of signals of a signaling pathway that drives drive abnormal growth of cells with KRAS mutations.
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Device hits pancreatic tumors hard with toxic four-drug cocktail, sparing the body
A new implantable device delivers first-line treatment for pancreatic cancer directly to tumors, bypassing bloodstream and limiting widespread side effects. A team of researchers from the University of North Carolina including Drs. Jen Jen Yeh and Joseph DeSimone, has shown in preclinical research that the device can deliver a particularly toxic dose of drugs directly to pancreatic tumors to stunt their growth or, in some cases, shrink them. This approach would also spare the patient toxic side effects.
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Low-risk prostate cancer best managed with active surveillance
UNC Lineberger researcher Dr. Ronald C. Chen was first-author of a report published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology that details guidelines for the active surveillance of men with low-risk prostate cancer. The guidelines, originally authored by Cancer Care Ontario, were reviewed and endorsed by the American Society of Clinical Oncology.
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Advances in melanoma treatment focus of UNC conference
At the 10th Annual UNC Conference on Melanoma and Complex Skin Cancers: A Multidisciplinary Perspective, experts in melanoma treatment presented advances in treating the disease on Thursday. The conference, held at the William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education, drew dermatologists, surgeons, medical oncologists and other health care providers to hear presentations on topics ranging from immunotherapy drugs and targeted treatments for metastatic disease, radiation strategies, and chemotherapy to prevent skin cancer.
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Lab Operations and Automation Manager Chatura Jayakody operates the liquid handler in the Center for Integrative Chemical Biology and Drug Discovery in Marsico Hall at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Located in Images / Faculty & Staff
Nanoparticle form of bone loss prevention drug effective against cancer, preclinical study finds
A preclinical study led by a UNC Lineberger researcher found that a nanoparticle form of a drug used to prevent bone loss was effective against small-cell lung and prostate cancer cells. The results were published in the journal Biomaterials.
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