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Two UNC Lineberger faculty receive 2011 Hettleman Awards
Two UNC Lineberger faculty, Noel Brewer, PhD, associate professor of health behavior and health education in the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health, and Karen Mohlke, PhD, associate professor of genetics in the UNC School of Medicine, have received the 2011 Hettleman Prize for Artistic and Scholarly Achievement by Young Faculty at UNC-Chapel Hill.
Located in News / 2011 News
UNC cancer researcher awarded top V Scholar ranking
The V Foundation for Cancer Research announced this week that Greg Wang, PhD, has been awarded the Martin D. Abeloff, MD, V Scholar Award. This award goes to the research project that receives the highest rating from the V Foundation’s Scientific Advisory Board. Wang was tied with Hongwu Zheng, PhD, of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory for this honor and is the 10th V Scholar from UNC Lineberger.
Located in News / 2011 News
New Fellowship Program in Psychosomatic Medicine Opens at UNC School of Medicine
Chapel Hill - A new fellowship training program in psychosomatic medicine is beginning at UNC, a partnership of the UNC School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry and the UNC Comprehensive Cancer Support Program, part of UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.
Located in News / 2011 News
Quicken Loans Carrier Classic Tickets Raise $45,000 for UNC Lineberger
Alumni Mortgage and Quicken Loans’ generous donation of two sets of tickets – plus a surprise donation of an additional pair by Coach Roy Williams, will send three sets of die-hard Tar Heel fans to San Diego to experience the 2011 Quicken Loans Carrier Classic on November 11, 2011.
Located in Ways to Help / / Signature Events / Old event stories
Scarring a necessary evil to prevent further damage after heart attack
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. – After a heart attack, the portions of the heart damaged by a lack of oxygen become scar tissue. Researchers have long sought ways to avoid this scarring, which can harden the walls of the heart, lessen its ability to pump blood throughout the body and eventually lead to heart failure. But new research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine shows that interrupting this process can weaken heart function even further.
Located in News / 2011 News