Search results

23 items matching your search terms.
Filter the results.
Item type













New items since



Sort by relevance · date (newest first) · alphabetically
UNC experts talk ‘Cancer Moonshot’ with Vice President Biden
As part of the “Cancer Moonshot” federal initiative to spur breakthroughs in cancer research, Biden hosted a roundtable discussion on Wednesday at the Duke University School of Medicine that featured cancer experts and leaders from UNC. Among the experts chosen for the panel were Stephanie Wheeler, PhD, UNC Lineberger member and assistant professor of health policy and management at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and Niklaus Steiner, UNC-Chapel Hill professor and co-founder of the Chapel Hill-based Be Loud! Sophie Foundation, which supports adolescents and young adults with cancer.
Located in News
Preclinical study finds no benefit for diabetes drug in pancreatic cancer
UNC Lineberger researchers found in a study published in PLOS ONE that the diabetes drug metformin failed to show any benefit against pancreatic cancer, despite excitement about the drug for potential anti-cancer benefits. They believe the study shows the importance of testing new therapies in preclinical animal models that incorporate actual tumor tissue to better predict patient response.
Located in News
Nanoparticle form of bone loss prevention drug effective against cancer, preclinical study finds
A preclinical study led by a UNC Lineberger researcher found that a nanoparticle form of a drug used to prevent bone loss was effective against small-cell lung and prostate cancer cells. The results were published in the journal Biomaterials.
Located in News
Study finds need for improved end-of-life care for parents with terminal cancer
Based on a survey of widowed fathers who had lost a spouse to cancer, UNC Lineberger researchers reported in the journal BMJ Palliative Care that additional research and improved end-of-life care are needed to specifically help dying parents as well as their families.
Located in News
marsicolabwide.jpg
Graduate student Manwika Charaschanya works in the Center for Integrative Chemical Biology and Drug Discovery in Marsico Hall at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Located in Research / Research Programs / Images
Physicians issue advice, raise questions about evaluating blood in the urine as a cancer sign
A new report from the American College of Physicians’ High Value Care Task Force issues advice for physicians on how to detect and evaluate blood found in the urine, which is known as hematuria. The report, which was first-authored by UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center member Dr. Matthew Nielsen, also raises questions about the potential harms associated with diagnostic tests that are commonly employed to evaluate this condition.
Located in News
blossom-next.jpg
Blossom Damania, PhD, Assistant Dean for Research, professor of microbiology and immunology at the UNC School of Medicine and a member of UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.
Located in landing / / Images / 2016
LCCC.jpg
Lab Operations and Automation Manager Chatura Jayakody operates the liquid handler in the Center for Integrative Chemical Biology and Drug Discovery in Marsico Hall at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Located in Images / Faculty & Staff
Social networks as important as exercise and diet across the span of our lives
UNC-Chapel Hill researchers show how social relationships reduce health risk in each stage of life in a new study. UNC Lineberger member Yang Claire Yang said the analysis "makes it clear that doctors, clinicians, and other health workers should redouble their efforts to help the public understand how important strong social bonds are throughout the course of all of our lives.”
Located in News
Device hits pancreatic tumors hard with toxic four-drug cocktail, sparing the body
A new implantable device delivers first-line treatment for pancreatic cancer directly to tumors, bypassing bloodstream and limiting widespread side effects. A team of researchers from the University of North Carolina including Drs. Jen Jen Yeh and Joseph DeSimone, has shown in preclinical research that the device can deliver a particularly toxic dose of drugs directly to pancreatic tumors to stunt their growth or, in some cases, shrink them. This approach would also spare the patient toxic side effects.
Located in News