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Images of health risks make indoor tanning messages more effective
UNC Lineberger's Seth Noar, PhD, and colleagues report in a new study that anti-tanning bed messages with images showing longer-term health effects, such as skin cancer or wrinkles, produced greater negative emotional reactions and higher ratings of effectiveness in a survey of female college students than text-only messages.
Located in News
UNC Lineberger launches innovative cellular immunotherapy program
UNC Lineberger, with its U.S. FDA-approved Good Manufacturing Practices, or “clean,” facility, is one of only a select academic centers in the United States with the capability to genetically modify patient immune cells for clinical use. This makes it possible for people who live in the Southeastern U.S. to stay closer to home to undergo cellular immunotherapy treatment.
Located in News
Revolutionary approach for treating glioblastoma works with human cells
UNC Lineberger's Shawn Hingtgen, PhD, and colleagues, in laboratory studies, have converted human skin cells into stem cells that can hunt down and kill human brain cancer, an important step to moving the approach closer to a clinical trial.
Located in News
Researchers unlock mechanism of drug resistance in aggressive breast cancer
In the journal Cancer Discovery, UNC Lineberger's Gary Johnson, PhD, and colleagues published findings on how triple negative breast cancer cells are able to bypass treatment with trametinib, an FDA-approved kinase inhibitor. They also demonstrated in a laboratory model a potential treatment approach that could prevent the onset of resistance.
Located in News
The dark side of ‘junk’ DNA: Repeating DNA sequences play a role in bone cancer
Ian J. Davis, MD, PhD, and colleagues published a paper in Cell Reports that found certain short, repetitive sequences of DNA play an important role in the development of Ewing sarcoma, a rare bone and soft tissue cancer that occurs most commonly in children and adolescents.
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'60 Minutes' profiles how UNC Lineberger is leveraging artificial intelligence
CBS's "60 Minutes" came to UNC Lineberger to learn how researchers are using IBM Watson to cull through and generate useful clinical insights from massive amounts of genetic data.
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Racial gaps persist in how breast cancer survivors function, feel during treatment and after
A UNC Lineberger study published in the journal Breast Cancer Research and Treatment drew upon surveys that assessed health-related quality of life issues for women aged 20 to 74 years who lived in North Carolina and had breast cancer. The analysis was part of the third phase of the Carolina Breast Cancer Study.
Located in News
Insurance, distance to care can be barriers to breast reconstruction
Researchers say breast reconstruction can help with self-esteem, sexuality and body image after cancer treatment. But a UNC Lineberger study led by Michelle Roughton, MD, has found that the type of insurance a woman has as well as distance to a plastic surgeon's office can be barriers to the procedure.
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Study finds Fitbits can be used to monitor symptoms in transplant patients
UNC Lineberger researchers say the findings of a new study published in the journal Quality of Life Research indicate that activity trackers could be a useful tool for tracking symptoms and physical function. These trackers may be especially useful for patients who are not able to self-report symptoms using questionnaires because of language barriers, literacy, cognitive or health status.
Located in News
Researchers advance studies of ultrasound that can image cancer’s abnormal vessels
UNC Lineberger researchers are studying a new form of ultrasound that can image the abnormal blood vessels feeding tumors. In a new study, they used this ultrasound technique to show that the abnormal blood vessels feeding cancer tumors extend beyond the tumor borders.
Located in News