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Genomic analysis paves way for personalized treatment of invasive lobular carcinoma
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers helped lead an effort by The Cancer Genome Atlas Network of researchers to map the genetic drivers of invasive lobular carcinoma, the second most commonly diagnosed invasive form of breast cancer. They found that this cancer type may be at least three different diseases that differ in their microenvironmental features and outcomes.
Located in News
Providing hope and healing through health
Even in the midst of treatment, many cancer patients are finding that exercise helps them to feel better, both physically and emotionally. Through the Get Real & Heal program, UNC researchers are digging deeper into the science behind why moving more can make a positive impact on patients' overall health and well-being.
Located in News
Rock stars for a day
As a breast cancer survivor, Barbara Martin has established a tradition – walking 39 miles to raise awareness and funds for breast cancer – that has become very special to her. This challenge became even more special this year, as her mother and daughter were both by her side along the way.
Located in News
Who says you can’t go home?
Amy Charney had already registered to run the 2015 Boston Marathon when she was told she had breast cancer. But not even that diagnosis and active treatment would keep her from crossing the finish line in her hometown of Boston.
Located in News
Early menarche may be important in development of aggressive breast cancer in African-American women
A multicenter research team known as the African American Breast Cancer Epidemiology and Risk Consortium (AMBER), which includes UNC Lineberger's Andrew Olshan, PhD has uncovered differences in ER-positive & ER-negative breast cancer pathways. The team examined whether relationships between age at menarche and breast cancer are the same for tumors that are ER-positive or ER-negative, particularly among African-American women. ER-negative breast cancer is generally more aggressive and known to be associated with a poorer prognosis than ER-positive disease.
Located in News
Assessment is first to measure breast and cervical cancer landscape in Zambia
The assessment, co-published by UNC Lineberger member and professor of gynecologic oncology Groesbeck Parham, MD, not only identifies the roadblocks to treatment, but also provides a path to overcoming them.
Located in News
UNC Lineberger breast cancer researcher wins ASCO foundation grant
Katherine Reeder-Hayes, MD, MBA, Msc, a UNC Lineberger member and a clinical assistant professor in the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, won a Career Development Award from the Conquer Cancer Foundation of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. She was one of 11 clinical investigators chosen to receive the three-year award, which goes to researcher-physicians to help them build independent clinical research programs.
Located in News
Ellen Martin: Battling Breast Cancer with Resilience and Research
A busy mom of two, Ellen Martin battled breast cancer with two powerful weapons – resilience and research. Following an aggressive breast cancer diagnosis, Ellen is now in remission thanks to a treatment plan driven by the latest findings in breast cancer research.
Located in News
A BRAIN Initiative first: new tool can switch behavior ‘on’ and ‘off’
Using a new ‘chemogenetic’ technique invented at UNC, scientists turn neurons ‘on’ and ‘off’ to demonstrate how brain circuits control behavior in mice. This unique tool – the first to result from the NIH BRAIN Initiative – will help scientists understand how to modulate neurons to more effectively treat diseases.
Located in News
Eligible for breast conserving therapy, many still choose mastectomy
New treatment strategies have given more triple-negative breast cancer patients the choice of breast-conserving surgery. But research led by Brigham and Women's Hospital, in collaboration with UNC Lineberger member David Ollila, MD, has shown that even when given the choice, more than 30 percent of patients still chose to have a complete breast removal via mastectomy.
Located in News