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Early menarche may be important in development of aggressive breast cancer in African-American women
A multicenter research team known as the African American Breast Cancer Epidemiology and Risk Consortium (AMBER), which includes UNC Lineberger's Andrew Olshan, PhD has uncovered differences in ER-positive & ER-negative breast cancer pathways. The team examined whether relationships between age at menarche and breast cancer are the same for tumors that are ER-positive or ER-negative, particularly among African-American women. ER-negative breast cancer is generally more aggressive and known to be associated with a poorer prognosis than ER-positive disease.
Located in News
Assessment is first to measure breast and cervical cancer landscape in Zambia
The assessment, co-published by UNC Lineberger member and professor of gynecologic oncology Groesbeck Parham, MD, not only identifies the roadblocks to treatment, but also provides a path to overcoming them.
Located in News
UNC Lineberger breast cancer researcher wins ASCO foundation grant
Katherine Reeder-Hayes, MD, MBA, Msc, a UNC Lineberger member and a clinical assistant professor in the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, won a Career Development Award from the Conquer Cancer Foundation of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. She was one of 11 clinical investigators chosen to receive the three-year award, which goes to researcher-physicians to help them build independent clinical research programs.
Located in News
Ellen Martin: Battling Breast Cancer with Resilience and Research
A busy mom of two, Ellen Martin battled breast cancer with two powerful weapons – resilience and research. Following an aggressive breast cancer diagnosis, Ellen is now in remission thanks to a treatment plan driven by the latest findings in breast cancer research.
Located in News
A BRAIN Initiative first: new tool can switch behavior ‘on’ and ‘off’
Using a new ‘chemogenetic’ technique invented at UNC, scientists turn neurons ‘on’ and ‘off’ to demonstrate how brain circuits control behavior in mice. This unique tool – the first to result from the NIH BRAIN Initiative – will help scientists understand how to modulate neurons to more effectively treat diseases.
Located in News
Eligible for breast conserving therapy, many still choose mastectomy
New treatment strategies have given more triple-negative breast cancer patients the choice of breast-conserving surgery. But research led by Brigham and Women's Hospital, in collaboration with UNC Lineberger member David Ollila, MD, has shown that even when given the choice, more than 30 percent of patients still chose to have a complete breast removal via mastectomy.
Located in News
Researchers find new approach to treat drug-resistant HER2-positive breast cancer
Using human cancer cell lines, UNC scientists identified various ways that HER2-positive breast cancer tumors resist therapy, and they discovered a potential combination therapy to overcome multiple mechanisms of resistance and kill cancer cells.
Located in News
UNC Lineberger-led study tests drug strategy for aggressive breast cancer in the brain
Results from a UNC Lineberger-led study were published Monday in the journal Molecular Cancer Therapeutics. The pre-clinical study was the first to investigate one particular drug strategy as a treatment for breast cancer after it's spread to the brain.
Located in News
Researchers explore roots of breast cancer disparities at symposium
A symposium co-sponsored by the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center brought leading breast cancer researchers together Friday to share findings about the genetic and environmental factors driving disparities in the disease’s incidence and mortality.
Located in News
Sherdinia Thompson-Dunn
Leading an active life can help women treated for breast cancer live longer and healthier lives. Just ask Sherdinia Thompson-Dunn of Carrboro, NC. Thompson-Dunn, a 1967 graduate of UNC, found some pleasant surprises when she began a self-directed walking program in October 2013 following treatment for breast cancer.
Located in Patient Stories / Patient Stories Gallery / Breast Cancer