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Roger Johnson
Siler City native Roger Johnson knows the value of personalized medicine. After being diagnosed with bladder cancer in 2013, physicians at UNC sequenced his tumor to better understand the genetics driving his cancer.
Located in Patient Stories / Patient Stories Gallery / Bladder Cancer
Clinical Research Forum selects genomic analysis as top 10 research achievement
A cancer genomics study led by UNC Lineberger researchers and other scientists involved in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project, a National Cancer Institute and National Human Genome Research Institute-backed effort to create a comprehensive atlas of the genetic changes in cancer, was selected as one of the top 10 clinical research achievements of the year. The project characterized molecular changes in 12 different cancers and revealed a new approach to classifying cancers.
Located in News
Cancer genetics the focus of UNC Lineberger symposium
UNC Lineberger's 39th annual scientific symposium was held April 8-9 at the William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education in Chapel Hill.
Located in News
Researchers find new approach to treat drug-resistant HER2-positive breast cancer
Using human cancer cell lines, UNC scientists identified various ways that HER2-positive breast cancer tumors resist therapy, and they discovered a potential combination therapy to overcome multiple mechanisms of resistance and kill cancer cells.
Located in News
Lower survival rates connected with high-risk melanoma with mutations, study finds
A UNC Lineberger-led study found that people with higher-risk melanoma containing either BRAF or NRAS gene mutations had lower survival rates.
Located in News
UNC Lineberger sequences 10,000 tumors as part of national cancer genomics effort
UNC sequenced the RNA for 10,000 tumor samples as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas project, a National Cancer Institute and National Human Genome Research Institute-backed effort to create a comprehensive atlas of the genetic changes in cancer.
Located in News
All the Cell’s a Stage
Brian Strahl, PhD, and his band of biochemists unravel the complicated mysteries of the epigenetic code to find a culprit in cancer development.
Located in News
UNC researchers find final pieces to the circadian clock puzzle
Sixteen years after scientists found the genes that control the circadian clock in all cells, the lab of UNC’s Aziz Sancar, MD, PhD, discovered the mechanisms responsible for keeping the clock in sync.
Located in News
Mauro Calabrese
PhD, Assistant Professor, UNC-Chapel Hill, Cancer Genetics
Located in People
Largest cancer genetic analysis reveals new way of classifying cancer
Researchers with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have completed the largest, most diverse tumor genetic analysis ever conducted, revealing a new approach to classifying cancers. The work, led by researchers at the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and other TCGA sites, not only revamps traditional ideas of how cancers are diagnosed and treated, but could also have a profound impact on the future landscape of drug development.
Located in News