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HHMI Bulletin explores James Bear's research
by Mary Ruth published May 16, 2012 last modified May 16, 2012 09:54 AM — filed under: , ,
Located in News / 2012 News
Dr. Nancy DeMore and UNC colleagues present triple-negative breast cancer finding at national meeting
by Mary Ruth published Apr 10, 2012 last modified Apr 11, 2012 01:50 PM — filed under: , ,
Nancy DeMore, MD, and colleagues presented an abstract at the recent Society of Surgical Oncology 65th annual cancer symposium held in Orlando, Florida in March. Dr. DeMore is an associate professor of surgery and a member of UNC Lineberger.
Located in News / 2012 News
Hematologic malignancies rapidly increasing and unaddressed in sub-Saharan Africa
by Mary Ruth published Apr 03, 2012 last modified Apr 03, 2012 09:42 AM — filed under: , , ,
UNC-led team offers clinical, research agenda
Located in News / 2012 News
Small DNA circles found outside the chromosomes in mammalian cells and tissues, including human cells
by Mary Ruth published Mar 12, 2012 last modified Mar 12, 2012 04:30 PM — filed under: , ,
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. – Researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have helped identify a new DNA entity in mammalian cells and provided evidence that their generation leaves behind deletions in different locations of the cells’ genetic program, or genome.
Located in News / 2012 News
Gershon receives grant to study brain tumor, develop novel therapy
by Mary Ruth published Mar 09, 2012 last modified Mar 12, 2012 10:05 AM — filed under: , ,
Timothy Gershon, MD, PhD, assistant professor of neurology, has received a four-year National Institutes of Health Mentored Clinical Scientist Research Career Development Award grant from the National Institute of Neurologic Disease and Stroke.
Located in News / 2012 News
Scarring a necessary evil to prevent further damage after heart attack
by Mary Ruth published Nov 15, 2011 last modified Nov 15, 2011 01:06 PM — filed under: , ,
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. – After a heart attack, the portions of the heart damaged by a lack of oxygen become scar tissue. Researchers have long sought ways to avoid this scarring, which can harden the walls of the heart, lessen its ability to pump blood throughout the body and eventually lead to heart failure. But new research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine shows that interrupting this process can weaken heart function even further.
Located in News / 2011 News
No evidence for potential competition between human papillomavirus types in men
by Mary Ruth published Nov 10, 2011 last modified Nov 10, 2011 03:39 PM — filed under: , ,
Chapel Hill - The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recently recommended that teenage boys be vaccinated against the human papillomavirus.
Located in News / 2011 News
Study links chemotherapy response to heritable factors
by Mary Ruth published Oct 27, 2011 last modified Oct 27, 2011 09:18 AM — filed under: , , ,
Findings guide future research on chemotherapy resistance
Located in News / 2011 News
UNC scientists offer first evidence of using biologically targeted nanoparticles to boost radiation therapy effects
by Mary Ruth published Oct 25, 2011 last modified Nov 18, 2011 11:19 AM — filed under: , ,
Chapel Hill - Making a tumor more sensitive to radiotherapy is a primary goal of combining chemo and radiation therapy to treat many types of cancer, but with the chemotherapy drugs come unwanted side effects.
Located in News / 2011 News
UNC spin-off receives $3M Small Business Innovation Research grant
by ellen.degraffenreid published Sep 30, 2011 last modified Oct 12, 2011 10:26 AM — filed under: , ,
Chapel Hill, NC – G-Zero Therapeutics, an RTP company started in 2008 based on technologies from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, has been awarded a $3 million Phase II Small Business Innovation Research Grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health.
Located in News / 2011 News