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A BRAIN Initiative first: new tool can switch behavior ‘on’ and ‘off’
Using a new ‘chemogenetic’ technique invented at UNC, scientists turn neurons ‘on’ and ‘off’ to demonstrate how brain circuits control behavior in mice. This unique tool – the first to result from the NIH BRAIN Initiative – will help scientists understand how to modulate neurons to more effectively treat diseases.
Located in News
Amy Charney
Amy Charney had already registered to run the 2015 Boston Marathon when she was told she had breast cancer. But not even that diagnosis and active treatment would keep her from crossing the finish line in her hometown of Boston.
Located in Patient Stories / Patient Stories Gallery / Breast Cancer
Assessment is first to measure breast and cervical cancer landscape in Zambia
The assessment, co-published by UNC Lineberger member and professor of gynecologic oncology Groesbeck Parham, MD, not only identifies the roadblocks to treatment, but also provides a path to overcoming them.
Located in News
Carey to co-chair national breast cancer clinical trials group
UNC Lineberger member Lisa A. Carey, MD, has been appointed co-chair of the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology Breast Committee. The national organization is responsible for developing new trials, ensuring each project’s scientific excellence, operational efficiency and productivity, and promoting collaboration with other NCI-funded clinical trials groups.
Located in News
Early menarche may be important in development of aggressive breast cancer in African-American women
A multicenter research team known as the African American Breast Cancer Epidemiology and Risk Consortium (AMBER), which includes UNC Lineberger's Andrew Olshan, PhD has uncovered differences in ER-positive & ER-negative breast cancer pathways. The team examined whether relationships between age at menarche and breast cancer are the same for tumors that are ER-positive or ER-negative, particularly among African-American women. ER-negative breast cancer is generally more aggressive and known to be associated with a poorer prognosis than ER-positive disease.
Located in News
Eligible for breast conserving therapy, many still choose mastectomy
New treatment strategies have given more triple-negative breast cancer patients the choice of breast-conserving surgery. But research led by Brigham and Women's Hospital, in collaboration with UNC Lineberger member David Ollila, MD, has shown that even when given the choice, more than 30 percent of patients still chose to have a complete breast removal via mastectomy.
Located in News
Ellen Martin: Battling Breast Cancer with Resilience and Research
A busy mom of two, Ellen Martin battled breast cancer with two powerful weapons – resilience and research. Following an aggressive breast cancer diagnosis, Ellen is now in remission thanks to a treatment plan driven by the latest findings in breast cancer research.
Located in News
Genomic analysis paves way for personalized treatment of invasive lobular carcinoma
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers helped lead an effort by The Cancer Genome Atlas Network of researchers to map the genetic drivers of invasive lobular carcinoma, the second most commonly diagnosed invasive form of breast cancer. They found that this cancer type may be at least three different diseases that differ in their microenvironmental features and outcomes.
Located in News
Melissa Troester, PhD – Team Science at its Best
UNC Lineberger member Melissa Troester, PhD, values a team approach in her work and her personal life. As co-leader of the cancer center’s Cancer Epidemiology Program, Troester’s work is an important part of UNC Lineberger’s interdisciplinary research on the causes of breast cancer and the translational research on strategies of prevention, treatment and cure.
Located in News
Menopausal status may be more important than age in breast cancer screening frequency, study finds
A study published in JAMA Oncology found that pre-menopausal women who were diagnosed with breast cancer following a biennial screening mammogram were likely to have more advanced tumors than woman screened annually. UNC Lineberger researcher Louise Henderson was a co-author on the study, which was co-led by researchers at the University of California-Davis School of Medicine and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.
Located in Newsletters / / Honors and Awards / 2015