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Jeannette T Bensen
PhD, Research Associate Professor, UNC-Chapel Hill, Cancer Epidemiology
Located in People
Cancer genetics the focus of UNC Lineberger symposium
UNC Lineberger's 39th annual scientific symposium was held April 8-9 at the William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education in Chapel Hill.
Located in News
Evans co-authors commentary in JAMA
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center member Jim Evans, MD, PhD, Bryson Distinguished Professor of Genetics and Medicine and director of clinical cancer genetics, has co-authored a commentary on proposed US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation of genetic testing in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).
Located in News
Evans discusses company's request for FDA approval of personalized DNA test
James P. Evans, MD, PhD, Bryson Distinguished Professor of Genetics and Medicine, is quoted in an article on NPR's website discussing a recent request by a genetic test maker for the Food and Drug Administration to approve its personalized DNA test.
Located in News / 2012 News
Evans discusses consumer-marketed genetic testing at Salon
In the article, "Do you want to know what will kill you?" at Salon.com, Jim Evans MD, PhD, Director of Clinical Cancer Genetics and UNC Lineberger member discusses the pros and cons of consumer-marketed genetic testing.
Located in News
Evans quoted in The News & Observer, Scientific American Blog
James P. Evans, MD, PhD, Bryson Distinguished Professor of Genetics and Medicine, is quoted in recent articles in The News & Observer and the Scientific American blog.
Located in News / 2012 News
Evans talks about DNA analysis on HuffPost Live
James P. Evans, MD, PhD, Bryson Distinguished Professor of Genetics and Medicine, provided his perspective on a HuffPost Live broadcast that aired on September 24, 2012.
Located in News / 2012 News
Genetic mutations linked to salivary gland tumors may point to new therapies
Faculty members at the University of North Carolina School of Dentistry, The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) and other institutions have discovered links between a set of genes known to promote tumor growth and mucoepidermoid carcinoma, an oral cancer that affects the salivary glands. The discovery could help physicians develop new treatments that target the cancer’s underlying genetic causes.
Located in News
Informatics approach helps doctors, patients make sense of genome data
Chapel Hill, NC – The cost of sequencing the entire human genome, or exome – the regions of the genome that are translated into proteins that affect cell behavior – has decreased significantly, to the point where the cost of looking at the majority of a patient’s genomic data may be less expensive than undertaking one or two targeted genetic tests.
Located in News / 2012 News
Lower survival rates connected with high-risk melanoma with mutations, study finds
A UNC Lineberger-led study found that people with higher-risk melanoma containing either BRAF or NRAS gene mutations had lower survival rates.
Located in News