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UNC scientists funded to study genome sequencing in clinical settings
by maryruth.helms published Dec 06, 2011 last modified Dec 19, 2011 10:09 AM — filed under: , ,
Chapel Hill - The complete sequence of an individual’s genome – all 3 billion DNA building blocks - will soon be affordably available to doctors, patients and even consumers. While knowledge of one’s genome may have important medical benefits, tremendous questions remain regarding an avalanche of such data means and how they should be used. Many clinical, ethical and social issues arise from the evaluation, use and sharing of the data.
Located in News / 2011 News
The power to help, hurt and confuse: direct-to-consumer whole genome testing
by maryruth.helms published Dec 06, 2011 last modified Dec 06, 2011 04:08 PM — filed under: , ,
CHAPEL HILL – The era of widely available next generation personal genomic testing has arrived and with it the ability to quickly and relatively affordably learn the sequence of your entire genome. This would include what is referred to as the “exome,” your complete set of protein-coding sequences.
Located in News / 2011 News
Goldstein, McCullough address needed measures to curb tobacco use
by maryruth.helms published Dec 02, 2011 last modified Dec 02, 2011 01:16 PM — filed under: , ,
Located in News / 2011 News
Donald Rosenstein serves as president of Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine
by maryruth.helms published Dec 01, 2011 last modified Dec 01, 2011 10:35 AM — filed under: ,
Donald Rosenstein, MD, professor of psychiatry and medicine in the UNC School of Medicine and director of the UNC Comprehensive Cancer Support Program, will serve a one-year term as president of the Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Dr. Rosenstein is a member of UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.
Located in News / 2011 News
President Obama taps Barbara Rimer to lead National Cancer Panel
by maryruth.helms published Nov 30, 2011 last modified Dec 06, 2011 12:25 PM — filed under: ,
President Obama has announced his intent to nominate Barbara K. Rimer, DrPH, Dean and Alumni Distinguished Professor of the University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health, to chair the President’s Cancer Panel. The panel was established as part of the National Cancer Act, signed by President Nixon in 1971
Located in News / 2011 News
P Rex-1 protein key to melanoma metastasis
by maryruth.helms published Nov 22, 2011 last modified Nov 22, 2011 11:22 AM — filed under: , ,
UNC scientists contribute cell studies and protein expression analysis
Located in News / 2011 News
Gehrig named director of UNC Gynecologic Oncology
by maryruth.helms published Nov 21, 2011 last modified Nov 30, 2011 11:50 AM — filed under: , ,
Paola Gehrig, MD, associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology, has been named director of UNC Gynecologic Oncology. In her new role she will oversee gynecologic oncology in the School of Medicine’s Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.
Located in News / 2011 News
Viruses and cancer focus of Damania’s talk at National Academy of Sciences annual science symposium
by maryruth.helms published Nov 21, 2011 last modified Nov 21, 2011 09:39 AM — filed under: ,
Blossom Damania, PhD, was a speaker at the Twenty-third Annual Kavli Frontiers of Science Symposium, held November 17-19, 2011 in Irvine, California. The symposium is hosted by the National Academy of Sciences.
Located in News / 2011 News
Protein associated with childhood cancer alters the structure of DNA, leading to cancer, UNC study shows
by maryruth.helms published Nov 17, 2011 last modified Nov 21, 2011 10:06 AM — filed under: , ,
Chapel Hill - UNC scientists have demonstrated for the first time how a critical gene associated with a type of childhood cancer alters the way DNA is packaged in cells and leads to cancer. Their laboratory discovery could result in the development of a targeted therapy to treat Ewing Sarcoma, a malignant bone and soft tissue tumor of children and young adults.
Located in News / 2011 News
Scarring a necessary evil to prevent further damage after heart attack
by maryruth.helms published Nov 15, 2011 last modified Nov 15, 2011 01:06 PM — filed under: , ,
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. – After a heart attack, the portions of the heart damaged by a lack of oxygen become scar tissue. Researchers have long sought ways to avoid this scarring, which can harden the walls of the heart, lessen its ability to pump blood throughout the body and eventually lead to heart failure. But new research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine shows that interrupting this process can weaken heart function even further.
Located in News / 2011 News