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You are here: Home / News / 2011 News / Perou Chairs Panel Discussion at 33rd Annual CTRC-AACR San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium

Perou Chairs Panel Discussion at 33rd Annual CTRC-AACR San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium

by Susan Lucas last modified Mar 30, 2011 02:33 PM
Perou Chairs Panel Discussion at 33rd Annual CTRC-AACR San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium

Charles M. Perou, PhD

CHAPEL HILL, NC - Charles M. Perou, PhD, Professor of Genetics and member of UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, chaired a panel at the 33rd Annual CTRC-AACR San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium on the topic of “Next Generation Sequencing for the Clinician.”

Over the last decade, Perou and his collaborators have defined intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer, based on genetic signatures developed using the previous generation of gene sequencing technology. The advent of next generation sequencing technologies allows physicians and scientists to quickly gather more data about the genetic makeup of tumors. As Perou noted in his remarks, it can now be easier to generate the data than analyze it.

The panel, which included Elaine R. Mardis, PhD, from Washington University in St. LouisIcon indicating that a link will open an external site. and Andrew Futreal, PhD, from the Wellcome Trust Sanger InstituteIcon indicating that a link will open an external site. in Cambridge, United Kingdom, explored different approaches for analyzing the enormously rich data derived from next generation sequencing, that has the potential to yield truly personalized tumor typing with the promise of helping thousands of women receive treatment tailored to their individual cancer’s prognosis.

In his remarks, Perou demonstrated the issues that scientists need to consider as technology evolves and when comparing genetic data generated by different, new platforms. He particularly emphasized the gains that scientists can achieve by sharing data, as in the Cancer Genome Atlas Project (TCGA)Icon indicating that a link will open an external site., an effort coordinated by the National Institutes of Health’s National Human Genome Research Institute in which Perou and his colleagues are actively participating Icon indicating link that will launch an Adobe pdf file.

All of the panelists emphasized the need for careful, thorough patient consent to having their genetic data used in scientific research, but also praised the patients who agree to allow genetic data from their tumors to be used for genetic analysis, noting that many recent treatment advances depend wholly on their generous participation.

The American Association for Cancer Research interviewed Dr. Perou at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium – watch videoIcon indicating that a link will open an external site..