UNC Lineberger News

UNC radiation oncology resident Nathan Sheets wins ASCO Merit Award

UNC radiation oncology resident Nathan Sheets wins ASCO Merit Award

The Conquer Cancer Foundation of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) will award 20 oncology trainees with Merit Awards at the 2012 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium. The symposium will be held February 2 - 4, 2012 in San Francisco.

UNC radiation oncology resident Nathan Sheets wins ASCO Merit Award - Read More…

Wrapped up in making a difference

Tori Frahm has experienced just eight Christmases, but she epitomizes the true spirit of the holiday. She and her family organized collection and delivery of 750 presents for pediatric oncology patients and their siblings at UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center. The gifts helped 125 families have a brighter holiday.

Wrapped up in making a difference - Read More…

Sing a song of hope - local caroling tradition brings cheer each year

One neighborhood in Cary has become the centerpiece of a holiday tradition that benefits UNC Lineberger.

Sing a song of hope - local caroling tradition brings cheer each year - Read More…

Editorial urges rapid clinical trials for targeted breast cancer therapies

Editorial urges rapid clinical trials for targeted breast cancer therapies

Chapel Hill, NC – In an editorial published today in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, UNC associate professor E. Claire Dees, MD, reviews current evidence on the safety and efficacy of combination therapies currently used for metastatic breast cancer and urges clinical researchers to move forward with new studies that leverage advances in the identification of tumor biomarkers.

Editorial urges rapid clinical trials for targeted breast cancer therapies - Read More…

Six UNC faculty recognized by prestigious international scientific society

Six University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill faculty members have been named fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Six UNC faculty recognized by prestigious international scientific society - Read More…

UNC Lineberger remembers Marci Campbell

UNC Lineberger remembers Marci Campbell

Dr. Marci Campbell, professor of nutrition at the University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health, died December 14 after living with cancer with grace and caring for almost two years.

UNC Lineberger remembers Marci Campbell - Read More…

UNC scientist elected Fellow of American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering

UNC scientist elected Fellow of American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering

Weili Lin, PhD, has been elected a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering. Lin was cited for his outstanding contributions to the development and translation of MR functional neuroimaging.

UNC scientist elected Fellow of American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering - Read More…

American Cancer Society Revises Cancer Screening Guideline Process; UNC scientists are report co-authors

ATLANTA –December 13, 2011– The American Cancer Society has revised its guideline formation process to achieve greater transparency, consistency, and rigor in creating guidance about cancer screening. The new methods align with new principles from the Institutes of Medicine (IOM) by creating a single generalist group for writing the guidelines, commissioning systematic evidence reviews, and clearly articulating the benefits, limitations, and harms associated with cancer screening tests. The new process is outlined in a Special Communication in the December 14, 2011 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

American Cancer Society Revises Cancer Screening Guideline Process; UNC scientists are report co-authors - Read More…

The power to help, hurt and confuse: direct-to-consumer whole genome testing

The power to help, hurt and confuse: direct-to-consumer whole genome testing

CHAPEL HILL – The era of widely available next generation personal genomic testing has arrived and with it the ability to quickly and relatively affordably learn the sequence of your entire genome. This would include what is referred to as the “exome,” your complete set of protein-coding sequences.

The power to help, hurt and confuse: direct-to-consumer whole genome testing - Read More…

UNC scientists funded to study genome sequencing in clinical settings

UNC scientists funded to study genome sequencing in clinical settings

Chapel Hill - The complete sequence of an individual’s genome – all 3 billion DNA building blocks - will soon be affordably available to doctors, patients and even consumers. While knowledge of one’s genome may have important medical benefits, tremendous questions remain regarding an avalanche of such data means and how they should be used. Many clinical, ethical and social issues arise from the evaluation, use and sharing of the data.

UNC scientists funded to study genome sequencing in clinical settings - Read More…

Donald Rosenstein serves as president of Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine

Donald Rosenstein serves as president of Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine

Donald Rosenstein, MD, professor of psychiatry and medicine in the UNC School of Medicine and director of the UNC Comprehensive Cancer Support Program, will serve a one-year term as president of the Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Dr. Rosenstein is a member of UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Donald Rosenstein serves as president of Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine - Read More…

President Obama taps Barbara Rimer to lead National Cancer Panel

President Obama taps Barbara Rimer to lead National Cancer Panel

President Obama has announced his intent to nominate Barbara K. Rimer, DrPH, Dean and Alumni Distinguished Professor of the University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health, to chair the President’s Cancer Panel. The panel was established as part of the National Cancer Act, signed by President Nixon in 1971

President Obama taps Barbara Rimer to lead National Cancer Panel - Read More…

Cell molecule identified as central player in the formation of new blood vessels

The molecule is the protein Shc (pronounced SHIK), and new blood vessel formation, or angiogenesis, is seriously impaired without it.

Cell molecule identified as central player in the formation of new blood vessels - Read More…

P Rex-1 protein key to melanoma metastasis

UNC scientists contribute cell studies and protein expression analysis

P Rex-1 protein key to melanoma metastasis - Read More…

Viruses and cancer focus of Damania’s talk at National Academy of Sciences annual science symposium

Viruses and cancer focus of Damania’s talk at National Academy of Sciences annual science symposium

Blossom Damania, PhD, was a speaker at the Twenty-third Annual Kavli Frontiers of Science Symposium, held November 17-19, 2011 in Irvine, California. The symposium is hosted by the National Academy of Sciences.

Viruses and cancer focus of Damania’s talk at National Academy of Sciences annual science symposium - Read More…

Gehrig named director of UNC Gynecologic Oncology

Gehrig named director of UNC Gynecologic Oncology

Paola Gehrig, MD, associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology, has been named director of UNC Gynecologic Oncology. In her new role she will oversee gynecologic oncology in the School of Medicine’s Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Gehrig named director of UNC Gynecologic Oncology - Read More…

Protein associated with childhood cancer alters the structure of DNA, leading to cancer, UNC study shows

Protein associated with childhood cancer alters the structure of DNA, leading to cancer, UNC study shows

Chapel Hill - UNC scientists have demonstrated for the first time how a critical gene associated with a type of childhood cancer alters the way DNA is packaged in cells and leads to cancer. Their laboratory discovery could result in the development of a targeted therapy to treat Ewing Sarcoma, a malignant bone and soft tissue tumor of children and young adults.

Protein associated with childhood cancer alters the structure of DNA, leading to cancer, UNC study shows - Read More…

Scarring a necessary evil to prevent further damage after heart attack

Scarring a necessary evil to prevent further damage after heart attack

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. – After a heart attack, the portions of the heart damaged by a lack of oxygen become scar tissue. Researchers have long sought ways to avoid this scarring, which can harden the walls of the heart, lessen its ability to pump blood throughout the body and eventually lead to heart failure. But new research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine shows that interrupting this process can weaken heart function even further.

Scarring a necessary evil to prevent further damage after heart attack - Read More…

Biomedical Research Imaging Center to be fourth U.S. site for MRPET scanner

Chapel Hill, NC – UNC’s Biomedical Research Imaging Center (BRIC) will be the fourth site in the United States to obtain a leading-edge imaging system called an MRPET scanner (also known as a PET-MRI). The machine will first be installed in current BRIC building but will be moved to the new building going up adjacent to the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, and BRIC director Weili Lin, PhD, is already strategizing with top experts in the field to put this innovative technology to good use.

Biomedical Research Imaging Center to be fourth U.S. site for MRPET scanner - Read More…

University of North Carolina and SAS fight cancer together

UNC Lineberger and SAS developing technology that tracks patient characteristics, treatment and outcomes

University of North Carolina and SAS fight cancer together - Read More…