Carey to co-chair national breast cancer clinical trials group

UNC Lineberger member Lisa A. Carey, MD, has been appointed co-chair of the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology Breast Committee. The national organization is responsible for developing new trials, ensuring each project’s scientific excellence, operational efficiency and productivity, and promoting collaboration with other NCI-funded clinical trials groups.

Carey to co-chair national breast cancer clinical trials group click to enlarge UNC Lineberger's Lisa A. Carey, MD, has been appointed co-chair of the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology Breast Committee.

University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center member Lisa A. Carey, MD, has been appointed co-chair of the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology Breast Committee.

The Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology develops and conducts cancer clinical trials, develops optimal treatment and prevention strategies for cancer, and researches methods to alleviate side effects of cancer and cancer treatments. The organization is a member of the National Cancer Institute’s National Clinical Trials Network and consists of nearly 10,000 cancer specialists at hospitals, medical centers and community clinics across North America.

Carey, physician-in-chief of the North Carolina Cancer Hospital, and the Richardson and Marilyn Jacobs Preyer Distinguished Professor in Breast Cancer Research, and Ann Partridge, MD, of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, will oversee the committee’s work, which focuses on breast cancer clinical research. The committee is responsible for developing new trials, ensuring each project’s scientific excellence, operational efficiency and productivity, as well as promoting collaboration with other NCI-funded clinical trials groups.

“Clinical trials are essential to the development of better, more effective treatments for breast cancer, most importantly because the treatments we are using to care for our patients today are largely the product of clinical trials we conducted 10-15 years ago.”

“Clinical trials are essential to the development of better, more effective treatments for breast cancer, most importantly because the treatments we are using to care for our patients today are largely the product of clinical trials we conducted 10-15 years ago,” said Carey, who is also chief of hematology/oncology in the UNC School of Medicine. “As such, it is critical we continue to work on improving how breast cancer clinical studies are prioritized, how they are conducted and how the information is shared.”

Carey is a nationally-recognized leader in breast cancer care and research. Her research is focused on the clinical implications of different molecular subtypes of breast cancer, evaluation of new chemotherapy agents in early breast cancer, and examination of tumor characteristics that predict response to therapy. She is the principal investigator of multiple clinical trials conducted at UNC and nationally and is a member of the NCI’s Breast Cancer Steering Committee, which reviews the design and prioritization of all NCI phase II and III breast cancer trials.