Milowsky to co-chair national bladder cancer task force

Matthew Milowsky, MD, will help oversee a panel that provides insight on bladder cancer research and priorities proposed by the National Cancer Institute’s Genitourinary Cancers Steering Committee.

Milowsky to co-chair national bladder cancer task force click to enlarge Matthew Milowsky, MD, has been elected as co-chair of the Bladder Cancer Task Force of the National Cancer Institute’s Genitourinary Cancers Steering Committee.

UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center’s Matthew Milowsky, MD, has been elected as co-chair of the Bladder Cancer Task Force of the National Cancer Institute’s Genitourinary Cancers Steering Committee. His term will run through February 2021.

The Genitourinary Cancer Steering Committee is charged with promoting the best clinical and translational research for patients with genitourinary cancers. It oversees three task forces, bladder, prostate and renal, which review and provide feedback on diseases-specific issues and strategic priorities

“Matt is an incredibly talented clinician and clinical researcher. The experience and insight he brings to task force are based on patient care and his grasp of modern science. He will help shape the national research priorities for bladder cancer, hoping to advance cure rates and quality of life for a disease that afflicts many,” said UNC Lineberger Director Shelton Earp, MD. “This is a well-deserved recognition of Matt’s contributions to advancing the care of bladder cancer patients and our knowledge of the disease. His appointment will benefit patients here in North Carolina and across the country.”

Milowsky is the co-director of the Urologic Oncology Program and section chief of Genitourinary Oncology at UNC Lineberger and is an associate professor in medicine at UNC School of Medicine.

In addition to his clinical responsibilities, Milowsky conducts clinical and translational research, with a particular interest in the design of clinical trials that utilize novel immunotherapies as well as those that use an integrated genomics approach to guide new therapies.