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Biological factors don't completely explain racial disparities for ‘good prognosis’ breast cancer
The biological features of patients’ tumors partially explained a racial disparity for women with hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer, but UNC Lineberger researchers led by Katherine Reeder-Hayes, MD, MBA, MSc, said it didn’t explain it completely. The preliminary findings were reported at the 2017 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.
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Timing could matter to how responsive cancer cells are to treatment, study suggests
In a new study published in Cell Systems, UNC Lineberger's Jeremy Purvis, PhD, and colleagues report that the timing of when DNA damage occurs within these different checkpoints matters to a cell’s fate.
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The dark side of ‘junk’ DNA: Repeating DNA sequences play a role in bone cancer
Ian J. Davis, MD, PhD, and colleagues published a paper in Cell Reports that found certain short, repetitive sequences of DNA play an important role in the development of Ewing sarcoma, a rare bone and soft tissue cancer that occurs most commonly in children and adolescents.
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'60 Minutes' profiles how UNC Lineberger is leveraging artificial intelligence
CBS's "60 Minutes" came to UNC Lineberger to learn how researchers are using IBM Watson to cull through and generate useful clinical insights from massive amounts of genetic data.
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UNC-Chapel Hill spinout company generates more than $108M in stock offering
Founded with support from KickStart Venture Services, a UNC-Chapel Hill program that works to turn University research into new companies, G1 Therapeutics is developing novel therapeutics based on discoveries at UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.
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Study sheds light on why some breast cancers have limited response to immunotherapy
Jonathan Serody, MD, Benjamin Vincent, MD, and a team of UNC Lineberger investigators published findings in the Journal of Clinical Investigation that may explain why drugs designed to unleash the immune system against cancer were ineffective in treating a type of triple negative breast cancer. They determined “claudin-low” tumors were releasing a chemical signal to attract regulatory T-cells, which prevented the immune system from rejecting the cancer.
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Using new knowledge about cell division, researchers look to improve chemotherapy effects
A study led by UNC Lineberger member Michael J. Emanuele, PhD, was featured on the cover of The Journal of Biological Chemistry. The researchers uncovered new details about a protein called NUSAP1 during chromosome segregation, and offered a possible way to sensitize cancer cells to a particular type of chemotherapy.
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UNC scientists create better laboratory tools to study cancer’s spread
In the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering, UNC Lineberger’s Andrew Wang, MD, and colleagues report they have developed tissue-engineered models for cancer metastases that reflect the microenvironment around tumors that promotes their growth. They believe their models, which were developed to study colorectal cancer that had spread to the liver and lung, will help scientists studying why cancers tend to spread to certain organs rather than others.
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Black women more likely to report not taking breast cancer medication as prescribed
A study led by UNC Lineberger’s Stephanie Wheeler, PhD, found that black women were more likely than white women to report not taking endocrine therapy for breast cancer as prescribed, which could help explain why hormone-receptor positive breast cancer mortality is higher among black women.
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Genetic alterations more common in tumors of older patients with metastatic breast cancer
In preliminary findings presented at the 2016 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, researchers showed that older patients were as likely as younger patients to receive targeted therapy and enroll in therapeutic trials based on their sequencing results.
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