Jenny Ting, PhD, was senior author of a study that found a potential therapeutic strategy for reducing the body’s typically damaging inflammatory response to severe dengue virus infection.

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Jenny Ting, PhD

Jenny Ting, PhD, a UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center member and the William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of Microbiology and Immunology at the UNC School of Medicine, was senior author of a paper published June 1 in The Journal of Biological Chemistry.

The article, “Interfering with antibody-enhanced IL-1β in dengue infection,” describes the researchers’ findings that the inhibition of a specific pathway called the spleen tyrosine kinase, or Syk, pathway has therapeutic promise for reducing the body’s typically damaging inflammatory response to severe dengue virus infection.

Co-authors include first author Justin B. Callaway, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow at UNC Lineberger; Scott A. Smith, MD, PhD, of the Vanderbilt Vaccine Center and the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine; Karen P. McKinnon, PhD, a research assistant professor in the UNC School of Medicine Department of Microbiology and Immunology; Aravinda M. de Silva, PhD, a professor in the UNC School of Medicine Department of Microbiology and Immunology; James E. Crowe Jr., MD, director of the Vanderbilt Vaccine Center and a professor of pediatrics, pathology, microbiology and immunology at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.

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