AACR 2016: Sequencing RNA in tumors could help improve cancer care, study finds

April 20, 2016

Sequencing a tumor’s RNA in addition to its DNA makes it possible to better characterize the cancer’s mutations, reported Neil Hayes, MD, MPH, at the American Association for Cancer Research’s annual meeting. This additional information, said Hayes, may help improve a cancer patient’s treatment.

AACR 2016: Blood test could gauge treatment response for head and neck cancer patients, pilot study shows

April 18, 2016

A potential new blood test is sensitive enough to detect changes in numbers of head and neck cancer cells circulating in the blood, a pilot study by UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers and collaborators has found. The findings from the study will be presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting in New Orleans on Tuesday, April 19.

AACR 2016: UNC researchers identify promising strategy to stop an aggressive breast cancer type once it’s spread to the brain

April 18, 2016

UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have identified a combination of investigational drugs that have been shown to be effective together at targeting triple negative breast cancer in the brain in preclinical studies. Their findings will be presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting in New Orleans, Tuesday, April 19.

AACR 2016: Increased saturated fat in diet linked to aggressive prostate cancer

April 18, 2016

A study by researchers from the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and other institutions found a link between higher intake of dietary saturated fat, a type of fat found commonly in foods such as fatty beef and cheese, and risk of aggressive prostate cancer. The preliminary results were presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting in New Orleans on Monday, April 18.

Weight loss surgery beats diet at inhibiting breast cancer, study finds

March 28, 2016

Weight loss surgery was more effective than a low-fat diet at reversing the cancer-promoting effects of chronic obesity in mice, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers report in a new study. The preliminary findings will be presented April 18 at the 2016 American Association of Cancer Research Annual Meeting in New Orleans.

It’s the amount you lose, not the diet you’re on, that matters in reversing cancer-obesity link

March 28, 2016

Researchers with UNC Lineberger examined whether weight loss via four different diets was linked to reduced tumor growth in laboratory models of breast cancer. While tumor size did not differ between obese mice and obese mice that returned to a normal weight on a low-fat diet, they did find that obese mice that lost significant amounts of weight on three calorie-restricted diets had smaller tumors.