August 14, 2019

The Many Roads of Esophageal Cancer: Treatments, Side Effects and Common Complications

 

Shifali Arora, MD

Shifali Arora, MD

Assistant Professor of Medicine
Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
UNC School of Medicine
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Kathleen Ferrell, PA-C

Kathleen Ferrell, PA-C

Physician Assistant
Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
UNC School of Medicine
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Lecture Description

Esophageal cancer treatments have evolved greatly over the last few decades. Depending on depth of invasion, endoscopic therapies are now part of the treatment algorithm. We will follow two cases from diagnosis to treatment to highlight therapeutic options and common side effects and complications.

Lecture Objectives:
  • Recognize the common complications and side effects associated with esophagectomy.
  • Recognize the common complications and side effects associated with cryotherapy and RFA.
  • Describe how to treat the most common post treatment symptoms.

 


July 10, 2019

Radiation Oncology 101

 

Jayne Camporeale, MS, RN, OCN, APRN

Jayne Camporeale, MS, RN, OCN, APRN

Assistant Professor
Adult Care Nurse Practitioner
Department of Radiation Oncology
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
UNC School of Medicine
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Mary Fleming Knowles, MSN, ANP-C

Mary Fleming Knowles, MSN, ANP-C

Adult Care Nurse Practitioner
Department of Radiation Oncology
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
UNC School of Medicine
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Lecture Description

Radiation therapy can be used alone or in combination with chemotherapy in cancer treatment plans. This discussion will review the different forms of radiation therapy (including Proton Therapy, etc.), how it works, and how it can be used in combination with chemotherapy. Since radiation therapy has its own set of side effects, the speaker will address the most common symptoms (such issues as appetite loss and radiation mucositis) and how to help patients deal with them.

Lecture Objectives:
  • Define radiation therapy and its use in oncology care.
  • Discuss the process a patient undergoes to receive Radiation Therapy.
  • Identify the side effects a patient may experience while receiving Radiation Therapy.

 


June 12, 2019

Helping Patients with Breast Cancer

 

Katharine Harrell, NP-C

Katharine Harrell, NP-C

Nurse Practitioner
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
UNC School of Medicine
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Lecture Description

This lecture touches on various topics important in helping breast cancer patients. We’ll discuss early detection, risk factors, diagnoses, treatment, and survivorship as well as breast cancer treatment modalities, including hormone inhibitors. Some patients will might want information about plastic surgery (breast reconstruction), and tips on using cryotherapy for prevention of peripheral neuropathy.

Lecture Objectives:
  • Identify basic breast anatomy and the components of a breast exam
  • Define benign v malignant breast disorders
  • Describe the basic treatment and follow-up of patients being treated for or having survived breast cancer therapies

 


May 8, 2019

Prostate Cancer Screening

 

Marc Bjurlin, DO, MSc, FACOS

Marc Bjurlin, DO, MSc, FACOS

Associate Professor, Department of Urology
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
UNC School of Medicine
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Meredith Crabtree, FNP-C

Meredith Crabtree, FNP-C

Nurse Practitioner, Department of Urology
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
UNC School of Medicine
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Lecture Description

The most common non-skin cancer among men in the U.S., prostate cancer can be difficult to catch early. With this lecture, we will talk about screening methods, such as MRI and MRI- ultrasound targeted fusion biopsy as a risk stratification tool for men at risk for prostate cancer. For men who undergo radiation treatment, we will also touch on which ones might consider utilizing hydrogels. We will also discuss the nurse’s role in prostate cancer screening and care.

Lecture Objectives:
  • Demonstrate the risks and benefits of PSA screening for prostate cancer.
  • Identify the role of MRI and MRI-ultrasound fusion biopsy in men at risk for prostate cancer.
  • Understand the role of hydrogel in radiation treatment for prostate cancer.

 


April 10, 2019

Preparing Patients for Treatment

 

Tammy Allred, RN, OCN

Tammy Allred, RN, OCN

Nurse Navigator
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
UNC School of Medicine
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Lecture Description

When a patient has received the life-changing news, she or he can feel overwhelmed by the need to digest the diagnosis while understanding and making decisions about sometimes rather complex treatment options. How do we plan and schedule the education for new chemo patients in a timely manner prior to the first day of chemo? What can we do to help the patient understand how the drugs work, what symptoms they can expect, and how they can deal with those symptoms?

Lecture Objectives:
  • Describe the emotional impact of a new cancer diagnosis on a patient’s ability to correctly interpret education.
  • Discuss how to coach through patient with decision making in treatment decisions.
  • Recall how to effectively communicate important information related to the new diagnosis, treatment options and how new treatments may affect the patient’s overall well-being and lifestyle.

 


March 13, 2019

Cancer-Related Cognitive Impairment:
More Than a Side Effect of Chemotherapy

 

Zev Nakamura, MD

Zev Nakamura, MD

Consult-Liaison Fellow, Department of Psychiatry
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
UNC School of Medicine
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Lecture Description

Cancer can impair a patient’s ability to think and to remember. While this condition is often called ‘chemo-brain,’ cognitive impairment stemming from cancer affects patients who might not have had either chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Dr. Nakamura will review our latest understandings of this condition.

Lecture Objectives:
  • Identify causes of cancer-related cognitive impairment.
  • Discuss morbidity associated with cancer-related cognitive impairment.
  • Describe evidence-based interventions for cancer-related cognitive impairment.

 


February 13, 2019

Safety Considerations When Managing
Dietary Supplements in Cancer Care

 

Jacob Hill, ND, MS

Jacob Hill, ND, MS

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Program on Integrative Medicine
Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
UNC School of Medicine
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Lecture Description

Jacob Hill’s main area of focus is integrative medicine and oncology. This lecture will cover various safety considerations regarding the combination of dietary supplements (herbal medicines, nutraceuticals, vitamins, minerals, etc.) and conventional cancer treatment. The lecture will discuss herb/drug interactions, mechanism interactions, food/drug interactions, as well as health systems and health behavior considerations. This lecture is intended to assist oncology providers in discussing dietary supplements with their patients and supporting the safe management of dietary supplements in cancer care.

Lecture Objectives:
  • Define herb/drug interactions and identify potential safety concerns when using herbal medicines with cancer care.
  • Describe and provide an example of a mechanism of interaction between a dietary supplement and cancer treatment medication.
  • Discuss health systems and health behavior considerations that increase the risk of a safety concern regarding dietary supplements in cancer care.

 


January 9, 2019

Disparities in Breast Cancer:
A Biology, Health Services and Solutions Story

 

Katherine Reeder-Hayes, MD, MBA, MSc

Katherine Reeder-Hayes, MD, MBA, MSc

Assistant Professor
UNC Breast Center
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
UNC School of Medicine
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Stephanie Wheeler, PhD, MPH

Stephanie Wheeler, PhD, MPH

Associate Professor
Health Policy and Management
UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health
Cancer Prevention and Control
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
UNC School of Medicine
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Lecture Description

This seminar will review the epidemiology of breast cancer disparities and cost of care as a potential determinant of differentiated access to and outcomes of care. We will conclude with potential solutions and future research opportunities.

Lecture Objectives:
  • Describe the epidemiology of racial disparities in breast cancer and identity the most affected subtypes.
  • Discuss how tumor biology impacts racial differences in breast cancer.
  • Identify evidence for disparities in treatment access and cost as factor in racial outcome differences.

 


December 12, 2018

Prevention of
Chronic Post-Operative Pain
in Cancer Patients

 

Photo of Dominika L. James, MD

Dominika L. James, MD

Assistant Professor, Department of Anesthesiology
Director, Inpatient Pain Service
Director, UNC Pain Fellowship Program
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
UNC School of Medicine
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Lecture Description

The talk discusses perioperative pain management techniques that can be utilized to decrease post-operative pain as well as development of chronic postoperative pain among cancer patients.

Lecture Objectives:
  • Define pain, outline early history of pain, and discuss concepts of peripheral and central sensitization in development of chronic pain.
  • Define persistent post-surgical pain and address incidence and causative factors contributing to PPSP among cancer patients.
  • Describe use of multimodal analgesics and regional anesthesia in preventing PPSP in the cancer population.

 


November 11, 2018

Caring for Adolescents and Young Adults Living with Cancer:
Meeting their Unique Medical and Psychosocial Needs

 

Lauren Lux, LCSW

Lauren Lux, LCSW

Program Director, Adolescent and Young Adult
Department of Pediatrics
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
UNC School of Medicine
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Lecture Description

Adolescents and Young Adult living with cancer have unique medical and psychosocial needs. The recognition of these needs has created a new field of study in practice in the oncology world. As such many institutions are developing multidisciplinary teams to address AYA needs. However, you don’t need a huge budget or a new program to make an impact with this age group. We will establish the age specific needs of this group and discuss some simple changes to make in your day to day practice that will help you meet your AYA patients’ needs.

Lecture Objectives:
  • Identify the unique medical and psychosocial needs of AYA cancer patients.
  • Discuss institutional barriers to delivering age specific care to AYAs with cancer.
  • Implement simple changes in clinical practice to improve care delivery and coordination for AYAs with cancer.

 


October 10, 2018

Understanding Oncology Drug Interactions

 

Katherine Morgan, PharmD

Katherine Morgan, PharmD, BCOP, CPP

Oncology Clinical Specialist, Outpatient Genitourinary and Neuro Oncology
UNC Medical Center
Assistant Professor, Clinical Education
UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Lecture Description

The narrow therapeutic index of oncology drugs makes understanding drug interactions critical for the safe and effective treatment of cancer patients. Small changes in the pharmacodynamics or pharmacokinetics of the drug can decrease efficacy or increase toxicity of the cancer drug potentially causing harm to patients during treatment.

Lecture Objectives:
  • Discuss the importance of identifying drug-drug interactions in patients receiving cancer directed therapy
  • Describe the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic factors that are impacted by drug-drug interactions
  • Identify important drug- drug interactions that could increase toxicity or decrease efficacy of a cancer therapy and how to manage them

 


September 12, 2018

Immunotherapy 101

 

Paul Armistead, MD

Paul Armistead, MD, PhD

Associate Professor
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
UNC School of Medicine
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Lecture Description

This lecture will review the mechanisms by which the immune system controls both infections and cancer, as well as strategies cancers have for evading effective immune responses and progression. The lecture will also discuss the different types of currently available cancer immunotherapy treatments, their mechanisms of action and their potential side effects.

Lecture Objectives:
  • List the various components of the human immune system and restate how they work together to generate a coordinated immune response
  • Explain the various mechanisms by which cancer can evade immune surveillance
  • Explain the different types of active and passive immunotherapies that are clinically used and their relative strengths and weaknesses

 


August 8, 2018

Survivorship Care Planning:
Beyond Standard 3.3

 

Deborah K. Mayer, PhD, RN, AOCN, FAAN

Deborah K. Mayer, PhD, RN, AOCN, FAAN

Director, Cancer Survivorship
Professor, School of Nursing
Cancer Prevention and Control
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
UNC School of Medicine
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Lecture Description

Survivorship is defined as one who remains alive and continues to function during and after overcoming a serious hardship or life-threatening disease. In cancer, a person is considered to be a survivor from the time of diagnosis until the end of life. This session will review the definition and attributes of being a survivor, what we know about survivors and their needs throughout their cancer journey. Survivorship care planning implications to meet these needs will be described and discussed.

Lecture Objectives:
  • Describe cancer survivorship trends over time
  • Define who is a cancer survivor and identify survivors needs across the cancer continuum
  • Discuss survivorship care planning to address unmet needs

 


July 11, 2018

Palliative Care Opportunities

 

Nicole Sartor, RN, MSN, C-PNP-PC

Nicole Sartor, RN, MSN, C-PNP-PC

Children’s Supportive Care Team
UNC Palliative Care Program
UNC School of Medicine
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Lecture Description

This talk will address common myths of palliative and hospice care and explore multiple points along the health trajectory of a patient when a team might consider a palliative care consult. We will consider possible sources of suffering and interventions.

Lecture Objectives:
  • Define pediatric palliative care (PPC) as a set of tasks
  • Identify predictable opportunities for palliative care interventions at different stages of disease
  • Evaluate myths and assumptions about PPC

 


June 13, 2018

Breast Imaging Technologies:
Cancer Detection & Personalized Medicine

 

Cherie M. Kuzmiak, DO, FACR, FSBI

Cherie M. Kuzmiak, DO, FACR, FSBI

Associate Professor, Department of Radiology
UNC School of Medicine
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Lecture Description

Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in the world. There is no preventable cause for the disease. Consequently, our best means for detection and saving lives is with screening. This lecture will focus on essential advances in breast imaging and cancer detection.

Lecture Objectives:
  • List three new developments in breast imaging
  • Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the advances in breast imaging and cancer detection
  • Describe how the advances in breast imaging and cancer detection can be applied to the participant’s practice patterns to benefit their patient

 


May 9, 2018

Medical Marijuana:
It’s High Time to Talk

 

Alisha Benner, MD

Alisha Benner, MD

Lead Physician
Aspire Health

Lecture Description

In recent years, the public and lawmakers have recognized the benefits of using marijuana as part of a treatment plan for patients with difficult diseases to manage. For example, cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy find that medical marijuana diminishes nausea and can stimulate appetite. This presentation provides an overview of the complex history of medical marijuana and the current applications of its use.

Lecture Objectives:
  • Recall the rich history and debate over medical marijuana
  • List at least 3 diseases for which medical marijuana has demonstrated clinical benefit
  • Discuss the “endocannabinoid system” and the “entourage effect”

 


April 11, 2018

The 7th Vital Sign:
Identifying Malnutrition

 

Meredith Moyers, MS, RD, CSO, LDN

Meredith Moyers, MS, RD, CSO, LDN

Registered Dietitian, Nutrition Program
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
UNC School of Medicine
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Lecture Description

Malnutrition can be a problem for cancer patients, since chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy might negatively affect a cancer patient’s appetite. This lecture discusses screening tools that are available to detect malnutrition and diagnose its extent.

Lecture Objectives:
  • Identify appropriate screening tools for malnutrition.
  • Determine the etiology, presence, and degree of malnutrition using the Academy/ASPEN adult malnutrition guidelines.
  • Review the nutrition-focused physical examination to determine the loss of subcutaneous fat and/or muscle mass and the presence of possible micronutrient deficiencies and fluid accumulation.

March 14, 2018

Improving End-of-Life Care:
What Can We Learn from the Bereaved?

 

Donald Rosenstein, MD

Donald Rosenstein, MD

Professor and Vice Chair, Division of Hospital Psychiatry
Director, Comprehensive Cancer Support Program
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
UNC School of Medicine
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Justin Yopp, PhD

Justin Yopp, PhD

Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
UNC School of Medicine
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Lecture Description

For the past eight years, Dr. Rosenstein and Dr. Yopp have run a support group for widowed fathers and conducted clinical research on this bereaved population.  In this talk, they will briefly review the literature on studies of bereaved subjects, their research findings, and lessons learned from these studies.

Lecture Objectives:
  • Differentiate the Dual Process Model of Bereavement from traditional stage models of grief and bereavement.
  • Identify major psychological challenges experienced by widowed fathers.
  • List several areas of end of life care that can be improved by the reports of the bereaved.

 


February 7, 2018

The Importance of an Integrated Emotional Support Program
for Physicians and Providers:
How Do We Take Care of Our Own?

 

Samantha Meltzer-Brody MD, MPH

Samantha Meltzer-Brody, MD, MPH

Associate Professor
Associate Chair, Faculty Development
Director, Perinatal Psychiatry Program
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
UNC School of Medicine
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Lecture Description

Provider burnout and compassion fatigue can impact both personal health and professional performance. This lecture will multiple strategies at the personal and system level that can be employed to mitigate the symptoms and move toward prevention.

Lecture Objectives:
  • Describe symptoms of burnout in health care providers and learn how to recognize them.
  • Describe compassion fatigue and the “second victim” experience in health care providers who experience adverse patient events, and the negative impact on health care providers.
  • Discuss strategies to mitigate the impact of burnout and compassion fatigue on providers at both the individual and system levels.

 


January 10, 2018

Fluorouracil (5-FU) Toxicities
and Strategies for Management

 

Aimee Faso, PharmD, BCOP, CPP

Aimee Faso, PharmD, BCOP, CPP

Clinical Assistant Professor
UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy
Clinical Specialist, Hematology/Oncology Outpatient Clinic
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
UNC School of Medicine
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Lecture Description

Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a relatively unique drug in oncology because administration in different doses and schedules results in dramatically different patterns of qualitative toxicity. This lecture will discuss the hematologic, skin, and GI toxicities along with strategies for management.

Lecture Objectives:
  • Identify and describe the hematological, dermatological, and gastrointestinal toxicities of 5-fluorouracil.
  • Describe methods to manage patients with 5-fluorouracil-related toxicities.
  • Describe the use of uridine triacetate in patients with 5-fluorouracil overdose or in patients who exhibit severe adverse reactions.