1ST ANNUAL CHROMATIN AND EPIGENETICS SYMPOSIUM

This First Annual Chromatin and Epigenetics Symposium will occur on the afternoon of December 7 in the Medical Biomolecular Research Building, room G-202. Invited speakers are Minkui Luo, PhD, of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and Alea A. Mills, PhD, of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. The event will also feature three trainee talks, a poster session, and reception. Abstract submission deadline November 17, 2017.

  • 1ST ANNUAL CHROMATIN AND EPIGENETICS SYMPOSIUM
  • 2017-12-07T13:00:00-05:00
  • 2017-12-07T17:00:00-05:00
  • This First Annual Chromatin and Epigenetics Symposium will occur on the afternoon of December 7 in the Medical Biomolecular Research Building, room G-202. Invited speakers are Minkui Luo, PhD, of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and Alea A. Mills, PhD, of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. The event will also feature three trainee talks, a poster session, and reception. Abstract submission deadline November 17, 2017.
When Dec 07, 2017 from 01:00 PM to 05:00 PM (EST / UTC-500)
Where Medical Biomolecular Research Buiding, room G-202
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Invited Speakers

Minkui Luo, PhD, Associate Professor, Chemical Biology Program, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Dr. Minkui Luo’s lab has been applying chemical tools and S-Adenosyl-L-methionine analogues to elucidate the epigenetic targets of protein methyltransferases.  In addition to defining the histone and non-histone targets on numerous epigenetic enzymes, his group has also been designing and synthesizing inhibitors to protein methyltransferases in an effort to develop novel anti-cancer drug candidates.

Alea A. Mills, PhD, Professor, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Dr. Alea Mills studies genetic pathways important in cancer, aging, and autism, identifying genetic players and determining how aberrations in their functions culminate in human disease. Through innovative use of a technique called “chromosome engineering,” the Mills group identified a tumor suppressor gene that had eluded investigators for three decades, Chd5, that regulates an extensive cancer-preventing network.  The epigenetic role of Chd5 in development, cancer, and stem-cell maintenance is currently being investigated.