News

Rochelle Grubb

In 2000, Rochelle decided to endow a graduate fellowship at UNC Lineberger in memory of her husband, Bob.

Rochelle Grubb always gave 110% to everything on her plate. She played a leading role in the revitalization of uptown Lexington, NC, was very involved in the real estate business started by her late husband, raised three sons, and was active with many non-profits in her community and throughout the state. In 1998, Rochelle joined the UNC Lineberger Board of Visitors. She had lost her husband Bob to colon cancer in 1995 and was committed to doing what she could to help in the fight against cancer.

In 2000, Rochelle decided to endow a graduate fellowship at UNC Lineberger in memory of Bob. The Robert L. Grubb Cancer Research Fellowship Fund helps the Cancer Center recruit and retain the best and the brightest post-doctoral fellows.

In June 2004, Rochelle faced her own battle with ovarian cancer which she lost less than a year later in May 2005. Her three sons – Clay, Gordon and George – wanted to find a meaningful way to honor their mother’s memory and help find a cure for cancer. They decided to support the Robert L. Grubb Cancer Research Fellowship with an additional gift of $25,000 and changed its name to honor both of their parents.

Today the Robert and Rochelle Grubb Cancer Research Fellowship Fund supports promising young cancer scientists. A visionary gift honoring two visionary community leaders.

Rod and Ruth Ann James

Rod and Ruth Ann James make yearly contributions to support research on the IORT (Intraoperative Radiotherapy) procedure currently in trial.

Rod and Ruth Ann James moved to Chapel Hill in October 2004. They chose Chapel Hill for a variety of reasons not the least of which was the medical care that was available at UNC. Little did they know that just months after moving to the area, Ruth Ann would be diagnosed with breast cancer.

Shortly after diagnosis, it was determined that Ruth Ann would be a good candidate for a new procedure currently in trial called Single Dose Intraoperative Radiotherapy (IORT). This method is an innovative way to offer a more convenient, potentially less toxic course of radiotherapy for patients with small breast cancers who may have difficulty with a daily regimen of whole breast radiation. This new procedure aims to give a patient a lumpectomy, sentinel node biopsy and a single dose of radiation directed into the tumor bed, all in one day. When Ruth Ann had her surgery in July 2006, she underwent IORT therapy as part of her procedure,

Following her surgery, Ruth Ann has been given a clean bill of health and she describes her treatment experience as amazing. She understood the importance of clinical trials and takes comfort that her participation improved her own care, paved the way for better treatments for other cancer patients and may help to save future lives.

Rod and Ruth Ann decided they wanted to do whatever they could to help this important research so each year they make contributions to support Dr. Carolyn Sartor, Ruth Ann’s doctor and the principal investigator of the IORT trial.

Sylvia & George Rountree

Sylvia and George Rountree made a gift to support the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and the new N.C. Cancer Hospital – one of the private infusion rooms in the new hospital will be named in their honor.

Sylvia and George Rountree of Wilmington, NC have a long family history of breast cancer. They are determined to provide the resources needed to develop innovative therapies and leading edge treatments for those suffering from this dreaded disease.

Understanding first hand the rigors of chemotherapy, they decided to make a gift of $50,000 to support the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and the new N.C. Cancer Hospital.

In recognition of their generosity, one of the private infusion rooms in the new hospital will be named in their honor. The adult infusion center triples the current capacity and features 58 private and semi-private infusion stations. There are 3 completely private infusion rooms designed for those patients who need special attention due to their health status or physical needs.

The Mary Claire Satterly Foundation

The Mary Claire Satterly Foundation has made a pledge to fund the Mary Claire Satterly Pediatric Oncology Playroom in the new N.C. Cancer Hospital.

On March 28, 2008, Mary Claire Satterly, 27—youngest daughter of Chip and Joan Satterly, "Little MC" to sisters, Karen ('96) and Laura ('98), and "Big Brother" Stephen—returned to her family home in Wilson, NC, to celebrate her godchild's baptism. MC was suffering from severe flu-like symptoms and her concerned dad, a physician, ordered tests. Mary Claire was diagnosed with acute myelogenous leukemia and admitted to UNC Hospital. Her siblings rushed from around the country to be by her side.

Still in strong spirits after the first of three bone marrow biopsies, MC declared, "As soon as I get home, I'm going to comfort any child going through this!" But on April 7th, just four days after her diagnosis, cancer ended Mary Claire's life.

Mary Claire was taken from us too soon, but her "MC Spirit!" will always live on. Established by family and friends, the Mary Claire Satterly Foundation honors this M ost C elebrated, S pirit. While Mary Claire ('02) was an accomplished advertising executive in New York and later San Francisco, she was truly a child at heart. Whether cheering for UNC basketball, reveling in beach sunshine, chasing her twin niece and nephew at the park, or celebrating all-things-Christmas, MC's life was filled with love and laughter.

The Foundation has pledged $250,000 to "Spread MC Spirit!" by funding the Mary Claire Satterly Pediatric Oncology Playroom in the new NC Cancer Hospital. Here, children battling cancer can simply be children—something and somewhere so dear to Mary Claire.

Rod and Ruth Ann James

Rod and Ruth Ann James make yearly contributions to support research on the IORT (Intraoperative Radiotherapy) procedure currently in trial.

Rod and Ruth Ann James moved to Chapel Hill in October 2004. They chose Chapel Hill for a variety of reasons not the least of which was the medical care that was available at UNC. Little did they know that just months after moving to the area, Ruth Ann would be diagnosed with breast cancer.

Shortly after diagnosis, it was determined that Ruth Ann would be a good candidate for a new procedure currently in trial called Single Dose Intraoperative Radiotherapy (IORT). This method is an innovative way to offer a more convenient, potentially less toxic course of radiotherapy for patients with small breast cancers who may have difficulty with a daily regimen of whole breast radiation. This new procedure aims to give a patient a lumpectomy, sentinel node biopsy and a single dose of radiation directed into the tumor bed, all in one day. When Ruth Ann had her surgery in July 2006, she underwent IORT therapy as part of her procedure,

Following her surgery, Ruth Ann has been given a clean bill of health and she describes her treatment experience as amazing. She understood the importance of clinical trials and takes comfort that her participation improved her own care, paved the way for better treatments for other cancer patients and may help to save future lives.

Rod and Ruth Ann decided they wanted to do whatever they could to help this important research so each year they make contributions to support Dr. Carolyn Sartor, Ruth Ann’s doctor and the principal investigator of the IORT trial.

Rochelle Grubb

In 2000, Rochelle decided to endow a graduate fellowship at UNC Lineberger in memory of her husband, Bob.

Rochelle Grubb always gave 110% to everything on her plate. She played a leading role in the revitalization of uptown Lexington, NC, was very involved in the real estate business started by her late husband, raised three sons, and was active with many non-profits in her community and throughout the state. In 1998, Rochelle joined the UNC Lineberger Board of Visitors. She had lost her husband Bob to colon cancer in 1995 and was committed to doing what she could to help in the fight against cancer.

In 2000, Rochelle decided to endow a graduate fellowship at UNC Lineberger in memory of Bob. The Robert L. Grubb Cancer Research Fellowship Fund helps the Cancer Center recruit and retain the best and the brightest post-doctoral fellows.

In June 2004, Rochelle faced her own battle with ovarian cancer which she lost less than a year later in May 2005. Her three sons – Clay, Gordon and George – wanted to find a meaningful way to honor their mother’s memory and help find a cure for cancer. They decided to support the Robert L. Grubb Cancer Research Fellowship with an additional gift of $25,000 and changed its name to honor both of their parents.

Today the Robert and Rochelle Grubb Cancer Research Fellowship Fund supports promising young cancer scientists. A visionary gift honoring two visionary community leaders.

Lois Blackman

Lois Blackman sent her first gift to UNC Lineberger in January of 2004, and since that first gift she and her husband, Leslie Jr., have sent a check every month to support prostate cancer research.

Lois Blackman of Faison, NC sent her first gift to UNC Lineberger in January of 2004. Her son, Leslie Blackman III, had been diagnosed with prostate cancer and was under the care of UNC physicians Young Whang and Eric Turner. Leslie was also participating in a research chemotherapy program directed by Dr. Whang. Her note accompanying her gift said, “I hope I shall be able to send gifts for research often. I know small gifts from enough people can make a difference!”

Lois was true to her word. Since that first gift, she and her husband, Leslie Jr. have sent a check every month to support Dr. Whang and his prostate cancer research. Their gifts are now made in memory of their son, who lost his battle with cancer in May of 2005.

When Lois was asked about being profiled in this publication, she responded with enthusiasm: “Once we saw a wall plaque honoring some well-known donor for his contribution. My son said, ‘When I get well, I’m going to give so I can be recognized for helping such a worthy cause.’ Leslie would be so grateful to be remembered.”

Lawrence J. Goldrich

Lawrence J. Goldrich made a gift to fund a garden at the Cancer Center in memory of his wife, Anita, and in 2007, he included UNC Lineberger in his estate plans.

Lawrence J. Goldrich '47 of Virginia Beach, VA has served his university in many ways over the years. In 1981 Larry chaired the Carolina Annual Giving Council, he served on the UNC Board of Visitors and the General Alumni Association Board of Directors. He continued his support of the University endowing the UNC Alumni Sculpture Garden adjacent to the Haynes Art Center, establishing the Chancellors Club and becoming its' first member. Larry has also been a loyal supporter and active volunteer at UNC Lineberger.

In the early eighties, Larry lost his wife Anita to cancer. He subsequently lost a number of his family and friends. Larry dedicated himself to support the leading edge cancer research being conducted by UNC Lineberger faculty. He also made a generous gift to fund a garden at the Cancer Center in memory of Anita. The Anita Friedman Goldrich Garden was dedicated in April 2006 and is a beautiful front door to the Cancer Center.

In 2007, Larry decided to include UNC Lineberger in his estate plans with a bequest of $100,000 for cancer research. He firmly believes that "the doctors, scientists, and staff at UNC Lineberger whose knowledge, dedication and determination have resulted in extraordinary progress to date, are within reach of a cure.” Larry comments “being in a position to support the University in so many different ways over these past 60 years has been the most rewarding experience of my life."

Harriet Farb

In January 2008, Breast Cancer Survivor Harriet Farb climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro to raise funds for UNC Lineberger patient support services.

Cancer patients often compare their experience to "climbing a mountain." Cancer patient Harriet Farb of Raleigh actually did it! In January 2008, Breast Cancer Survivor Harriet Farb climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro to raise funds for UNC Lineberger patient support services. Harriet made it to 17,000 feet – unfortunately, 70 mph winds prevented her and others in her party from reaching the summit.

"I have been blessed," Harriet explained, "and now is my chance to pay back for all the love and support I have received as a cancer patient. I see patients in the clinics who have driven hours to get here, so gas cards and meal and parking vouchers are a huge help to them."

Through her climb, she raised $15,000 for the UNC Patient and Family Resource Center. Her determination, courage, and compassion has also inspired all other cancer patients to reach higher, push forward, and to live fully each and every day.

Harriet died of her illness in October 2010.

Eileen Jefferson

Eileen Jefferson set up the George Jefferson Cancer Education Fund in 2002 in memory of her husband, George.

How else do you celebrate your 80th birthday but host a roaring 20s party for all your friends? Last October, Eileen Jefferson decided to mark her milestone birthday in style. In lieu of birthday gifts, she asked for folks to make a gift to her favorite charity, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, and over $2,600 was contributed!

In 2001 after a courageous two year battle, Eileen lost her husband George to leukemia. During George’s illness, they personally experienced the dedication and compassionate care of the UNC oncology nurses. Eileen decided to create the George Jefferson Cancer Education Fund which supports educational opportunities for outpatient oncology nurses.

Since its creation in 2002, the George Jefferson Cancer Education Fund has grown to over $25,000 and has provided support for our outpatient oncology nurses to attend valuable national conferences.

Eileen Jefferson

Eileen Jefferson set up the George Jefferson Cancer Education Fund in 2002 in memory of her husband, George.

How else do you celebrate your 80th birthday but host a roaring 20s party for all your friends? Last October, Eileen Jefferson decided to mark her milestone birthday in style. In lieu of birthday gifts, she asked for folks to make a gift to her favorite charity, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, and over $2,600 was contributed!

In 2001 after a courageous two year battle, Eileen lost her husband George to leukemia. During George’s illness, they personally experienced the dedication and compassionate care of the UNC oncology nurses. Eileen decided to create the George Jefferson Cancer Education Fund which supports educational opportunities for outpatient oncology nurses.

Since its creation in 2002, the George Jefferson Cancer Education Fund has grown to over $25,000 and has provided support for our outpatient oncology nurses to attend valuable national conferences.

Eileen Jefferson

Eileen Jefferson set up the George Jefferson Cancer Education Fund in 2002 in memory of her husband, George.

How else do you celebrate your 80th birthday but host a roaring 20s party for all your friends? Last October, Eileen Jefferson decided to mark her milestone birthday in style. In lieu of birthday gifts, she asked for folks to make a gift to her favorite charity, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, and over $2,600 was contributed!

In 2001 after a courageous two year battle, Eileen lost her husband George to leukemia. During George’s illness, they personally experienced the dedication and compassionate care of the UNC oncology nurses. Eileen decided to create the George Jefferson Cancer Education Fund which supports educational opportunities for outpatient oncology nurses.

Since its creation in 2002, the George Jefferson Cancer Education Fund has grown to over $25,000 and has provided support for our outpatient oncology nurses to attend valuable national conferences.

Chapel Hill Breast Cancer Foundation

For over ten years, the Chapel Hill Breast Cancer Foundation has raised money for UNC Lineberger through tennis and golf tournaments.

Over ten years ago, two breast cancer survivors – Ann Peterson and Debbie Howard – decided to raise money for breast cancer research being done right here in North Carolina. They recruited a friend with financial background, Debbie Frazier, and formed the Chapel Hill Breast Cancer Foundation. They vowed that the Foundation would raise money with no administrative costs and donate all money raised each year to the three NCI-designated research facilities in North Carolina – UNC Lineberger, Duke, and Wake Forest. They organized a Pro-Am tennis tournament at the Chapel Hill Country Club, which has become more and more successful every year. In 2004, they decided to add a golf tournament at Treyburn Country Club in Durham.

This past year the Chapel Hill Breast Cancer Foundation hosted its 10th Annual tournament, donating $17,304 to UNC Lineberger to support innovative research at the UNC Breast Center – bringing the ten year total to over $100,000! This passionate group of volunteers is committed to continue these annual events until a cure for breast cancer is found. Thanks to their generous support, we get closer every year.

Aurora Waddell

Two weeks before her birthday party, Aurora Waddell announced that she wanted all of her guests to bring gifts of money, not for her, but for the N.C. Cancer Hospital.

Most children getting ready to celebrate their 7th year birthday would be wishing for presents wrapped up in pretty paper and silk bows. Not Aurora Waddell of Mebane. Two weeks before the much anticipated pool party, Aurora announced to her parents that she wanted all her guests to bring gifts of money, not for her, but for the N.C. Cancer Hospital. A rather unusual request of someone so young, you might say. But then again, Aurora is not your typical little girl. A cancer battle with Wilms tumor, fought twice, has instilled a wisdom and sensitivity well beyond her years.

Aurora’s mother Anna reflects: " I'm thankful for the superb care at UNC and the always effervescent Aurora. Dr. Julie Blatt and the entire pediatric team were so competent and caring. There was never a doubt that our daughter was in the best hands."

As Aurora blew out the candles on her birthday cake in one fell swoop, Anna and Joe reflected back on their incredible journey and took a moment to count their blessings once again. Happy birthday, Aurora!

Aurora Waddell

Two weeks before her birthday party, Aurora Waddell announced that she wanted all of her guests to bring gifts of money, not for her, but for the N.C. Cancer Hospital.

Most children getting ready to celebrate their 7th year birthday would be wishing for presents wrapped up in pretty paper and silk bows. Not Aurora Waddell of Mebane. Two weeks before the much anticipated pool party, Aurora announced to her parents that she wanted all her guests to bring gifts of money, not for her, but for the N.C. Cancer Hospital. A rather unusual request of someone so young, you might say. But then again, Aurora is not your typical little girl. A cancer battle with Wilms tumor, fought twice, has instilled a wisdom and sensitivity well beyond her years.

Aurora’s mother Anna reflects: " I'm thankful for the superb care at UNC and the always effervescent Aurora. Dr. Julie Blatt and the entire pediatric team were so competent and caring. There was never a doubt that our daughter was in the best hands."

As Aurora blew out the candles on her birthday cake in one fell swoop, Anna and Joe reflected back on their incredible journey and took a moment to count their blessings once again. Happy birthday, Aurora!

Chapel Hill Breast Cancer Foundation

For over ten years, the Chapel Hill Breast Cancer Foundation has raised money for UNC Lineberger through tennis and golf tournaments.

Over ten years ago, two breast cancer survivors – Ann Peterson and Debbie Howard – decided to raise money for breast cancer research being done right here in North Carolina. They recruited a friend with financial background, Debbie Frazier, and formed the Chapel Hill Breast Cancer Foundation. They vowed that the Foundation would raise money with no administrative costs and donate all money raised each year to the three NCI-designated research facilities in North Carolina – UNC Lineberger, Duke, and Wake Forest. They organized a Pro-Am tennis tournament at the Chapel Hill Country Club, which has become more and more successful every year. In 2004, they decided to add a golf tournament at Treyburn Country Club in Durham.

This past year the Chapel Hill Breast Cancer Foundation hosted its 10th Annual tournament, donating $17,304 to UNC Lineberger to support innovative research at the UNC Breast Center – bringing the ten year total to over $100,000! This passionate group of volunteers is committed to continue these annual events until a cure for breast cancer is found. Thanks to their generous support, we get closer every year.

Aurora Waddell

Two weeks before her birthday party, Aurora Waddell announced that she wanted all of her guests to bring gifts of money, not for her, but for the N.C. Cancer Hospital.

Most children getting ready to celebrate their 7th year birthday would be wishing for presents wrapped up in pretty paper and silk bows. Not Aurora Waddell of Mebane. Two weeks before the much anticipated pool party, Aurora announced to her parents that she wanted all her guests to bring gifts of money, not for her, but for the N.C. Cancer Hospital. A rather unusual request of someone so young, you might say. But then again, Aurora is not your typical little girl. A cancer battle with Wilms tumor, fought twice, has instilled a wisdom and sensitivity well beyond her years.

Aurora’s mother Anna reflects: " I'm thankful for the superb care at UNC and the always effervescent Aurora. Dr. Julie Blatt and the entire pediatric team were so competent and caring. There was never a doubt that our daughter was in the best hands."

As Aurora blew out the candles on her birthday cake in one fell swoop, Anna and Joe reflected back on their incredible journey and took a moment to count their blessings once again. Happy birthday, Aurora!

Christina Story

When Christina Story started volunteering with “Get Real and Heel,” she saw a need for funding and approached her mother about recommending a grant from her family’s foundation.

When Christina Story ’08 of Atlanta, Ga. was a senior in Exercise and Sport Science at UNC, she learned about “Get Real and Heel,” an innovative program developed by one of her teachers. The program is designed to provide breast cancer patients with individualized exercise and recreational plans to help manage treatment-related symptoms and increase survival rates. A family member of Christina’s had recently undergone chemotherapy treatment for breast cancer, and Christina was inspired to volunteer for “Get Real and Heel,” bringing a personal commitment to her training sessions with patients.

During this time, she became aware that funding for the program was limited, and that some qualified patients would be turned away. Christina talked to her mother, Janice, who administers her family’s foundation, and together they recommended a $15,000 grant from the Kulynych Family Foundation so that more patients will be able to “Get Real and Heel.”

Bill Whisenant & Kelly Ross

Bill Whisenant and Kelly Ross decided to participate in the Capstone Challenge in honor and memory of Bill’s sister, Gail Whisenant Towne.

Bill Whisenant and Kelly Ross of Chapel Hill, NC decided to participate in the Capstone Challenge for the Lineberger Seed Grant Program in honor and memory of Bill’s sister, Gail Whisenant Towne. Gail courageously battled breast cancer for two years. Gail was only 49 years old when she died in August 2007. She is survived by two children Melissa age 25 and Patrick Towne age 24.

Bill and Kelly feel that early stage research supported by the Seed Grant Program is critical in discovering treatments and potential cures for cancer. While seed money can be the toughest to find, at UNC Lineberger, a little bit goes a long way. Seed Grants provide the resources for a researcher to investigate new paths and often, the knowledge gained through Seed Grant funding can be leveraged into much larger research grants from more conventional funding sources like the National Institutes of Health.

Bill and Kelly created the Gail Whisenant Towne Endowment Fund for Seed Grant Research with a commitment of $25,000. This permanent endowment fund honors Gail and supports innovative research that will directly benefit other cancer patients.

Bill Whisenant & Kelly Ross

Bill Whisenant and Kelly Ross decided to participate in the Capstone Challenge in honor and memory of Bill’s sister, Gail Whisenant Towne.

Bill Whisenant and Kelly Ross of Chapel Hill, NC decided to participate in the Capstone Challenge for the Lineberger Seed Grant Program in honor and memory of Bill’s sister, Gail Whisenant Towne. Gail courageously battled breast cancer for two years. Gail was only 49 years old when she died in August 2007. She is survived by two children Melissa age 25 and Patrick Towne age 24.

Bill and Kelly feel that early stage research supported by the Seed Grant Program is critical in discovering treatments and potential cures for cancer. While seed money can be the toughest to find, at UNC Lineberger, a little bit goes a long way. Seed Grants provide the resources for a researcher to investigate new paths and often, the knowledge gained through Seed Grant funding can be leveraged into much larger research grants from more conventional funding sources like the National Institutes of Health.

Bill and Kelly created the Gail Whisenant Towne Endowment Fund for Seed Grant Research with a commitment of $25,000. This permanent endowment fund honors Gail and supports innovative research that will directly benefit other cancer patients.